New Discoveries at the Barker Mansion

Today the staff members did something that has been on our bucket list since the beginning of the summer- we opened up the attic spaces and took a peak inside. The staff have anxiously awaited this afternoon when we would all be free to take our flashlights out and see if the Purdue (or even the Barkers) left some treasures in the attic. There are two openings into the attic- one in the old 1857 part of the mansion and the other in the ballroom on the 3rd floor of the 1905 edition. Who knew what we would expect! Would there be enough room to physically inspect brickwork or would we be blocked at the door and only take a small look into the area where so many of our visitors ask questions about. I was not taking any risks when it came to climbing up into the attic. I came to work prepared with my jeans stuffed into long socks and boots. It looked like I was going into a bio-hazardous situation with my NASA sweatshirt pulled over my head and secured with a mask. But I wanted to be safe rather than sorry.

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Suited up for our attic adventure

 

When we opened the attic in the 1857 house,  fellow Heritage Interpreter T.J. and I were able to crawl around and examine where the old brick meets the new edition. We saw original piping and what looked like the makings of an old duct in the kitchen. Instructions for the laying of wool insulation littered the area beneath us as we carefully made our way to each rafter. The Ballroom was not as fruitful. I had hoped to find a bust of Katherine Barker which would complete our set of busts of John H. Barker, Anna Barker, and young Catherine Barker. I wanted to find missing pictures or perhaps small toys that were placed there for safe keeping and later forgotten. Unfortunately, all we saw was modern insulation.

Seeing the attic was just another way I could really visualize what sort of construction was happening in the mansion over 100 years ago. I can more accurately define where the 1857 house ends and the new edition begins after seeing that raw footprint. But like any good researcher, we were left with even more questions and more opportunities for some interpretation of the construction in our Behind the Scenes tours. The sites were truly remarkable and warrant further research to bring what we saw today into aspects of our tours and exhibits.

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Heritage Interpreter T.J. Kalin takes the first look into the 3rd floor attic

If you are looking to know more about the workings of the mansion or simply just want to peak into rooms that are not included on the 1pm guided tour, come to our Behind the Scenes tours on Wednesday nights at 7pm. Doors open 15 prior to the tour. Capacity is limited to the first 15 guests that arrive. Tickets are $15/adult, $10/youth.

See http://www.barkermansion.com for more details.


Emily Reth

Heritage Interpreter

 

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